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Mudjacking Services

Knowledgeable Foundation Repair Professionals

Do you have concrete patios, sidewalks, and slabs that are cracked, buckled, and uneven? Not only is this concrete slab movement an eye sore for your property, but it's also dangerous. These uneven surfaces are often the culprit for trip hazard accidents and injuries.

The experienced foundation repair professionals at Ram Jack can offer numerous concrete slab repair services, including a method known as "mudjacking", to remedy uneven slabs. Mudjacking (aka "slabjacking" or "pressure grouting") is an effective way to provide a hydraulic lift to concrete surfaces that are sinking or shifting. This is frequently the result of erosion, poor drainage, and soil settlement beneath the slabs. Mudjacking can provide support and raise uneven slabs by injecting a special grout mixture into voids beneath the surface.

Mudjacking is the process of:

  • Drilling small holes through the compromised concrete surface

  • Pumping grout (water and concrete mixture) into holes

  • Ensuring that existing voids are filled, the grout dries and provides a hydraulic lift to the slab so it becomes level

Mudjacking is a relatively swift and noninvasive way to bring uniformity back to your concrete slabs. If your home or property is suffering from uneven patios or walkways, then your nearest Ram Jack office is ready to hear from you. One of our foundation repair consultants can assess your property and, if needed, offer you a long lasting and affordable solution.

*Not all locations offer this specialized service.

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